John & Maxine Belger Family Foundation
 
Belger Arts Center
Current Exhibitions
Terry Winters
Creighton Michael


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Current Exhibition
March 7, 2008 to June 6, 2008

Terry Winters
Works from the John & Maxine Belger Family Foundation

Click thumbnail images to view larger image.
Terry Winters - Morula (III)   Terry Winters - Furrows (III)   Terry Winters - Locus  

Terry Winters graduated from Pratt Institute in 1971 and spent a decade painting in his Manhattan studio before his first solo exhibition at the Sonnabend Gallery in New York. Within months of that exhibition, Winters, like Jasper Johns and Robert Rauschenberg before him, ventured to Long Island, to Universal Limited Art Editions, and began a serious exploration of printmaking.

Art historian Richard Axsom comments on this crucial period in Winters’ career in his essay*, “The Philosophers’ Stone: The Prints of Terry Winters”:

His style had evolved from a painterly minimalism, influenced by Brice Marden and Robert Ryman, to an organic abstraction delineated with references to early biological life. His first prints would reflect this world of forms. But why the decision to make prints at this point and then on a continuous basis over the next sixteen years? First, he felt ready to work in a medium that had attracted him for some time. Second, Bill Goldston’s invitation to make prints at ULAE helped prompt the move, which was further aided by the immediate rapport between the two men. Most importantly, however, was the role of drawing in Winter’s art.

Winters visited ULAE once a week for the next two years and concluded this formulative period with the Morula prints that are included in this exhibition. The Morula prints were produced by Winters transferring drawings made on thin papers to stones or plates with solvents or by photo-transfer methods. The prints were done on thick, handmade, Toyoshi paper from Japan. A morula is an embryo at an early stage of embryonic development.

After beginning with Bill Goldston, Winters has worked with other printmakers over the years, notably Aldo Crommelynck in Paris who was Picasso’s last master printer. Many of the ideas Winters first developed at ULAE continued: the emphasis on exploring images of basic life forms, the attention to special papers and various methods for producing the works on paper, and the use of a series of prints to develop an idea.

This collection of artworks by Terry Winters represents one of the cornerstones of the collection of the John and Maxine Belger Family Foundation. In addition to the Winters pieces the Foundation holds extensive works by Jasper Johns, Terry Allen, Renee Stout, William Christenberry, William Wiley, and Robert Stackhouse. In 2007 artworks from the collection could be seen at the Smithsonian American Art Museum in Washington, DC, the Burroughs-Chapin Museum in South Carolina, at galleries of Texas Tech University, the University of Virginia, and Syracuse University, and other venues.

* Mr. Axsom’s essay appears in Terry Winters Prints 1982-1998: A Catalogue Raisonne by Nancy Sojka and Nancy Barr; 1999; published by the Detroit Institute of Arts.

 


 
Belger Arts Center
Current Exhibitions
 



Current Exhibition
March 7, 2008 to June 6, 2008

Creighton Michael
Cursive
Creighton Michael talks about his work.   > Creighton Michael Video <   Click for Video.    

Click thumbnail images to view larger image.
Creighton Michael - Edge 593   Creighton Michael - Notation 998   Creighton Michael - SQUIGGLE (caption)  

Creighton Michael conducted a
Gallery Talk on opening night.

The Belger Arts Center is pleased to host Creighton Michael’s first solo exhibition in Kansas City. Michael, a native of Tennessee, has maintained an active studio in New York since 1978. His observations of natural structure and variation coupled with his exploration into the duality of drawing have informed his work.

He follows a course of study to its very end, giving full respect to the pictorial space and to the parameters of the problem he has placed before himself. The dialogue that he sets up between the painting and sculpture supports this careful and thorough approach to the creative endeavor and all originate out of the artist’s interest in drawing. Indeed, it must be understood from the beginning that the conceptual underpinnings of all of Michael’s work is the practice of drawing and the movement of line in space, whether that line is painted, drawn, or dimensional.“

- J. Susan Isaacs, Ph.D.,
  Professor of Art History and Curator of the
  Department of Art Galleries, Towson University
  Adjunct Curator, Delaware Center for the   Contemporary Arts

"Although meticulously executed, there is an underlying abandonment of control over these paintings that are constructed layer upon layer, mark upon mark. In these works Michael explores the fine line between the metaphysical and material. His intense exploration of both naturalistic and aesthetic processes probes the very notion of perception-how we interpret through our senses both nature and the mystery of matter comprising the physical world."

- Carla M. Hanzal
  Curator, The Mint Museums

Prolific in both two- and three-dimensional formats, Michael says of his work, “Drawing is primary, not preliminary.” His artwork explores the various facets of drawing from its material composition, its physical articulation associated with process and its involvement with emerging patterns, to its relationships with other marking activities such as calligraphy and notation. His interest began nearly two decades ago when he became fascinated with the ever-shifting structures and mutating patterns of duckweed. Through this observation, Michael quickly realized a parallel between the effect of random occurrences and the act of drawing. From there he would discover the primacy of a mark, which could be experienced simultaneously as an expressive unit and collectively as pattern. Cursive documents these developments.

Michael holds degrees from the University of Tennessee (BFA), Vanderbilt University (MA), and Washington University (MFA). He has taught and lectured at Princeton University, Hunter College, the Rhode Island School of Design and other institutions of higher learning. Michael has received fellowships from the New York Foundation for the Arts and the Edward Albee Foundation, and a Pollock-Krasner Foundation grant, in addition to other awards and honors. Besides the John and Maxine Belger Family Foundation collection, Michael’s work can be found in the collections of AT&T, American Express, The Brooklyn Museum, Denver Art Museum, the High Museum of Art, the National Gallery of Art and others.

  The Belger Arts Center - 2100 Walnut, 3rd Floor - Kansas City, MO 64108 - Office: (816) 474-3250  
  The Belger Arts Center is located on the 1st & 3rd floors at 2100 Walnut St. Kansas City, MO in the Crossroads Arts District.
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 © 2004-2009 Belger Foundation : Website donated Nathan Sharfi 2004. Updated by: Staff 2005,06, Vetter 2007, Sharfi 2004-05,08,09.